recording a dvd audio track

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coonsanders
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Joined: Mon Jan 04, 2010 12:25 pm

recording a dvd audio track

Post by coonsanders » Sun Jan 31, 2010 5:27 pm

hi gang

heres the situation...im trying to record the audio portion of a dvd so i opened up the exterior sound cards
control panel and connected the audio out from the dvd player into the line in on the soundcard control panel
then i tried to record the audio portion and it was working...now heres the problem...i tried to adjust the
audio portion as its going into the computer but then later on the vu meters went into the red and then i had
to readjust it and start again..its getting hard to do this.is there a better way?thanks.

lenny

DougDbug
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by DougDbug » Mon Feb 01, 2010 3:47 pm

i tried to adjust the audio portion as its going into the computer but then later on the vu meters went into the red and then i had to readjust it and start again..its getting hard to do this.is there a better way?thanks.
If I understand you, this isn't a problem with GoldWave, it's just that the 1st part of the DVD is quieter than some other part?

No. There's no easy solution.

Except, maybe you can "rip" the audio (digitally extract) from the DVD.

You can search the Net for "DVD audio ripper"

You should be aware that in most countries it is illegal to "crack" the copy protection on commerical DVDs. (You can't get this kind of software from a retail store or from websites that sell ligitimate software.)

If you're doing one or two DVDs, it's probably easier to continue with your current procedure and make an "analog" recording (actually digital-to-analog-to-digital). BTW - Assuming your computer has DVD drive, you can play the DVD on your computer and record What-U-Hear.

If you want to extract the audio from several DVDs, and/or if you want to preserve maximum quality, it's probably worthwhile to learn some new software rip the audio digitally.



* I can extract audio from an unencrypted DVD (or decrypted DVD) with my video editor (Corel Video Studio).
Last edited by DougDbug on Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

coonsanders
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by coonsanders » Mon Feb 01, 2010 5:50 pm

hay doug

thats what im trying to do...the dvd in question was made by a friend of mine in texas...there r 2 musical shorts on it and i did record this audio portion before but with this new sound card its a little harder.i can rip them but its harder with this new exterior sound card...maybe you can reccommend a setting in goldwave that i wont have to worry about the highs in the file
itself.thid sound card is so much better than the onboard card thats why im going to all this trouble..

lenny

DougDbug
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by DougDbug » Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:01 pm

..maybe you can reccommend a setting in goldwave that i wont have to worry about the highs in the file
itself.
The only setting is the recording volume. When you overdrive the ADC (analog-to-digital converter) you have a clipped (flat-topped) waveform, and there's nothing you can do.

There may be some software with automatic volume control (not GoldWave) but you usually don't want the volume "pumping" up down during recording. Plus, you'd still get some clipping because the software can't know there's a problem 'till after the signal comes out of the ADC, and by then its too late...

With 16 bits (and one bit used for the +/- sign) you can "count" to: 111111111111111 (binary) = (32,767 decimal). A 16-bit ADC simply cannot count any higher. (FYI - Professionals use 24 bit ADCs, and they keep the levels well below clipping.)
...thats what im trying to do...the dvd in question was made by a friend of mine in texas...there r 2 musical shorts on it...
With short non-encrypted videos there might be a much easier way! If you open the DVD with Windows Explorer you will see a VIDEO_TS folder (and usually an empty AUDIO_TS folder). Inside the VIDEO_TS folder you will find audio/video files with names like "VTS_01_0.VOB". (VOB files contain MPEG-2 video along with audio in one of 3 different formats.)

Copy the .VOB file(s) to your hard drive an rename them to .MPG. Now, try opening the MPG files with GoldWave. If your friend used LPCM audio, the files should open and you can re-save (the audio only) in the format of your choice!

Now, there are a couple of reasons this might not work... By default, GoldWave can't open Dolby audio, so if the DVD has Dolby (instead of LPCM) you probably can't open it. Also, VOB files are a maximum of ~1GB each and a song/track/chapter can be split-up between two or more VOB files. (The DVD player doesn't care about this, but it's a problem if you try to edit.)
i can rip them but its harder with this new exterior sound card...
FYI - The soundcard is not used for "ripping"! When we say "rip" we are talking about a digital copy... Data is read directly from the CD or DVD and written directly to the hard drive (perhaps with a format conversion)... We are not "recording'" audio or "capturing" video. Ripping is usually much faster than real-time recording. And since we're not recording, we don't have to worry about setting recording levels!

With DVD ripping software the 1GB VOB files are joined together and the audio/video is often converted to another format. For example, there is a very popular freeware program called Handbrake that converts (non-encrypted) DVDs to a format that plays on the iPod.

CD ripping programs like EAC or Audiograbber (or GoldWave) can read the CDDA format on a CD and convert it to WAV, MP3, etc.
Last edited by DougDbug on Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.

DewDude420
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by DewDude420 » Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:06 pm

im trying to record the audio portion of a dvd
stop right there. when it comes to talking about extracting audio off a DVD, you are treading on VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY delicate territory.

you stated that the DVD is from your friend...but as i found out from my activities on another forum....this does NOT allow one to explain how to extract DVD audio off a disc. regardless of who made the disc...the procedures can be used for piracy uses. despite the person's DVD was non-copyrighted and the extraction was completely legal....someone got upset and I was sent a very nasty threatening letter for "promoting and explaininng piracy"...

I know, i'm a hard-@$$...however, you're not the one that has to deal with DMCA takedown notices and other threats of legal issues, Chris is...so let's keep this..and all other discussion about DVD audio (other than how to properly author/edit audio for a home-dvd project) elsewhere,

coonsanders
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by coonsanders » Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:12 pm

o sorry...

lenny

DougDbug
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by DougDbug » Mon Feb 01, 2010 9:15 pm

this does NOT allow one to explain how to extract DVD audio off a disc. regardless of who made the disc...
Good point jay! I removed the links to illegal software. I believe it's OK to make an "analog" recording for personal use (in most countries) as this does not involve "cracking" copy protection.

And, it should be OK to discuss ligitimate programs like Corel Video Studio or Handbrake that can rip or copy non-encrypted DVDs. Of course, copyright laws still apply, and you cannot share or re-publish copyrighted material.

DewDude420
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by DewDude420 » Tue Feb 02, 2010 11:58 pm

I believe it's OK to make an "analog" recording for personal use (in most countries) as this does not involve "cracking" copy protection
In the US? Nope. It's not. It USED to be however under provisions in the Home Recording Act of 1992...the DMCA effectively made most of that void. Most of the reason it's allowed to go on is becuase the analog hole is considered a loss of quality....

The entire what's legal and what's not is seriously iffy anymore. It's not illegal to talk about a lot of stuff...it's just how it's implied. So if someone asks how they can record audio through Stereo Mix...that's fine...in fact, often times it's best to leave the actual purpose out of the question. the whole problem becomes when they mention what they want to do with it...if it violates copyright in any form...THEN the knowledge can be linked to copyright infringement..and the DMCA is either quite clear or pretty fuzzy in that it doesn't apply to just cracking...

However, on the other hand you've got a judge saying that one should be allowed to copy his or her own CD to a media player for personal listening....and for the most part...that's considerd ok...there was no cracking involved in the audio CD format. DVD's are different...you pretty much can't talk about copying those. DRM protected content is also an off limits also....

I'm not a laywer, by any sense..I only know a couple and in the years I've been online I've gotten like, 5 notices....3 of them I complied with and 2 of them were later withdrawn...with my laywers getting a "research" exception...then of course there's all the "samples" of audio that pretty much go completely unnoticed/cared about.

You're right about the discussing legitimate programs in legitimate uses....EVEN if the same procedure can be used for illegal purposes.....seriously..it's all about the context in which the question/article/howto is written....that's been my expierence.

DougDbug
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by DougDbug » Fri Oct 13, 2017 11:55 pm

You know... If all else fails, you can play the DVD (on your computer) and record the sound it as it's playing...

Or you can play it in your DVD player, but if you don't have a desktop/tower computer with a regular soundcard, you'll need an external USB interface with line inputs.

I'll give you some website links where they discuss this kind of thing, but I'm not going to recommend any specific illegal software.

Gizmos Freeware (TechSupportAlert.com)
DigitalFAQ.com
AfterDawn.com
Knoji.com

Some of the best programs are free, so try the free ones first. I only use free software for the illegal-decrypting part of the project.


-----------------------------------
I've got about 100 concert DVDs and I've made MP3s from all of them. Here's an outline of what I do.

1. Decrypt and copy the DVD (the files in the VIDEO_TS folder).

I use a program that decrypts the files and has an option to make a single-large VOB file. Sometimes that (very old and outdated) program can't crack the copy protection, so I run another ripping application first, then run the one that has more features/options..

Some DVDs have multiple audio tracks (i.e. stereo and 5.1 or DTS & Dolby, or multiple languages). Some ripping software allows you to select one and discard the others. This is often the only way to "extract" the track you want.

2. Combine the 1MB VOB files into one long VOB (or MPG) file.

There are a couple of decrypting/ripping programs that can do that, or you may need to use a separate program.

I've used VOB2MPG to make a single MPG from the (non-encrypted) 1MB VOB files, but it "stopped working", maybe with a Windows update, and I haven't re-tried it for awhile.

Most video editing software can also import (non-encrypted) DVD files. (I've used VideoStudio and PowerDirector.) Once you've imported the audio/video you can export an audio file or make a single MPG audio/video file, or make an edited copy of the DVD, etc.

3. Extract the audio.

Once I've got one-big VOB file I'll try to open it in GoldWave. If it's a format that GoldWave can't open, I'll use Audacity with the optional FFmpeg library. TAudioConverter can also extract the audio.

Or again, almost any video editor can export the audio-only.

4. Edit to individual song files (with GoldWave).

I usually take-out any excessive talking, make a short fade-in of the applause/crowd noise, and a longer fade-out at the end of the song. And frequently, I'll "steal" applause from different parts of the recording and mix it in, if the existing applause can't be faded-out nicely. (Sometimes I'll steal applause from another recording.)

I also make a full-concert file, sometimes "tightening-up" the gaps/talking between the songs. If I'm making a CD, I'll use that one so there's a continuous program with no gaps between songs (only applause & "natural" background noise).

Waffles
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by Waffles » Sun Oct 15, 2017 12:37 am

I used to use VLC to rip DVD audio, but it always took me a lot of fiddling to figure out the right title and right audio track.

Now I use Nero Recode. (I have the old 2014 version. According to angry customer reviews, newer version have dropped some if not most Bluray features, FYI.)

2leftfeet
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by 2leftfeet » Sun Oct 15, 2017 6:05 pm

You can use Videomeld to edit the audio & video parts of a VOB file. Copy the VOB file onto your hard drive and then open it as a video track in Videomeld. You will see that the video and audio tracks are linked (a paperclip symbol). Left click on one of them to unlink. You can then edit either video and/or audio tracks as you wish. Save as an MPEG4 file. You need to configure the basic Videomeld settings first - E.G. the aspect ratio and HD settings. It is all in the help files. If you only want to save the audio track, just use the "meld to audio track" option. You must register Videomeld to save long files though, however you can preview the whole project to confirm that you have got it all OK.

DewDude420
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by DewDude420 » Tue Oct 17, 2017 5:59 pm

SmartRipper will extract the indvidual streams from a VOB on a DVD....somehow.

From a research perspective:

I've been buying Weird Al on HDTracks. I happen to have a copy of Straight Out of Lynwood on DualDisc. I wanted to compare the editions. I used SmartRipper to extract the LPCM tracks from the video portion.

Actual DVD-Audio discs are a different specification.

Felingui
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by Felingui » Thu Nov 09, 2017 3:11 am

is there anybody knows handbrake? I use it to convert my MKV to MP4 but no sound after converting???? I search a lot, a page said that handbrake cannot extract audio(page link:http://www.videoconverterfactory.com/ti ... audio.html) but I just convert video instead of audio, right? So, why not sound? as the page said that??? what should I do next?

SuzTunes
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by SuzTunes » Thu Nov 09, 2017 2:49 pm

Waffles wrote:I used to use VLC to rip DVD audio, but it always took me a lot of fiddling to figure out the right title and right audio track.

Now I use Nero Recode. (I have the old 2014 version. According to angry customer reviews, newer version have dropped some if not most Bluray features, FYI.)
I was going to recommend this, I use VLC for so much. It converts video files as well. Like you said though it can be difficult, but I usually just find a WikiHow guide for it.

DougDbug
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Re: recording a dvd audio track

Post by DougDbug » Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:56 pm

is there anybody knows handbrake? I use it to convert my MKV to MP4 but no sound after converting????
There are LOTs of audio/video conversion utilities out there. Here are some recommendations.*

MKV is a "container format" and I think it usually contains MP4, but that's up to whoever made the MKV. And with audio/video files, the audio stream is often a different format than the video stream.

Audacity with the optional FFmpeg library can open/extract the audio from almost anything.




* I use a program called SUPER that can convert almost anything-to-anything (or extract the audio, etc.). But I cannot recommend it... It installs crapware and the last time I installed it, it almost killed my computer! I still use it occasionally, but I'll never install or upgrade it again.

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