Sampled EQ

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craigballengee
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Sampled EQ

Post by craigballengee » Wed Dec 27, 2006 8:45 pm

I have many MP3 files of various sound qualities. What I would like to do is to sample the overall EQ settings from what I consider a good sounding file and apply those EQ settings to all my files. So for example, if 10kHz peaked at -2db on the "good" sounding file, by applying this feature to another file, 10kHz would peak at -2db on the other file. This would basically take a frequency curve from one file and attempt to force those same frequencies on another. Is this possible? Do plugins already exists to do this? In not, could this feature be added or a plugin developed?

Thanks

GoldWave Inc.
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Re: Sampled EQ

Post by GoldWave Inc. » Thu Dec 28, 2006 4:29 pm

GoldWave does not have any way of doing that kind of processing. I'm not sure it would be useful unless all the files contained very similar audio. For example, consider a file that has mostly silence in the 10kHz range. Boosting that band to -2dB would amplify the noise level severely. Equalization is more relative than absolute, but an absolute EQ is an interesting idea.

Chris

Dreamy
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Re: Sampled EQ

Post by Dreamy » Sun Jan 28, 2007 10:09 am

Hello!

Why is it impossible? It’s a good idea, if I want to process my recordings in batch, and every recordings’ frequency course is different from the others. Oh yes, this function would be bullshit, e.g. if I would use it for classical music, but it’s a good possibility to repair $#|+ quality LPs, and tapes (they won’t be wronger…), and to preprocess songs of a megamix. Naturally, between in certain limits, for example I have to define the number of the “bands”, and of course the level of the “gain”, the “center” point, and “width” (like parametric eq). But I could determine the “desired gain”, not the difference from current peak level. GoldWave could constitute the difference between the “desired gain” and the “current gain” at the defined frequencies (center, width) on the basis of “average peak level”, that refers to the current spectrum, shape or average (like noise reduction). Of course, to avoid the exaggerated noise, I have to define a tolerance limit at the certain gain level, so under that level GoldWave couldn’t use this function, and the volume couldn’t be increased.
For example:
Frequency points (center):
50, 100, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, 10000, 16000Hz
width:
100, 100, 800, 1000, 2000, 4000, 12000, 12000Hz
Now I’m using the average frequency level, so GoldWave shows me the frequency course, that refers to the all sound I marked.
The Goldwave counted these averaged levels at the certain frequency points:
-20, -5, -2, +2, +3, +2, 0, -20dB.
I define the tolerance level = -10dB.
I want a flat frequency course, so I define the desired points:
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0dB.
And GoldWave calculates the difference between desired and current peak levels (so, they will be added or subtracted to/from the current level, in certain width):
0, +5, +2, -2, +3, +2, 0, 0dB
So, the first and the last values are not +20dB, because -20dB is less then the tolerance point (-10dB).
And the new frequency course is:
-20, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, -20dB, +-xdB, and x depends on (also) the number of bands!

It’s a good idea, or not? I think you’d better realize it. :-) Thank you!

GoldWave Inc. wrote:GoldWave does not have any way of doing that kind of processing. I'm not sure it would be useful unless all the files contained very similar audio. For example, consider a file that has mostly silence in the 10kHz range. Boosting that band to -2dB would amplify the noise level severely. Equalization is more relative than absolute, but an absolute EQ is an interesting idea.

Chris
István

proent
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Post by proent » Wed Jan 31, 2007 7:14 am

I recommend you try a free program called MP3 Gain.. google for it

GoldWave Inc.
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Re: Sampled EQ

Post by GoldWave Inc. » Wed Jan 31, 2007 6:27 pm

I didn't say it was impossible, just that GoldWave does not have that kind of functionality yet. It would be a kind of multiband compressor/expander effect. There are some DirectX effects that provide similar processing.

Chris

Dreamy
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I'm gonna try it

Post by Dreamy » Mon Feb 12, 2007 4:34 pm

proent wrote:I recommend you try a free program called MP3 Gain.. google for it
Thank you!
I'm gonna try it, I will report about the result.
István

Dreamy
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Post by Dreamy » Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:45 am

proent wrote:I recommend you try a free program called MP3 Gain.. google for it
Hello!
Was it a joke? MP3 Gain can only maximize the volume. We're talking about equalization.
István

mh
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Post by mh » Thu Mar 15, 2007 7:03 pm

Yes, I think it's a great idea too, so long as the musical styles are similar. We all have LPs where the frequency mix is far from ideal, and which we'd like to convert to digital, but using standard EQ techniques is a bit too hit and miss.

Emmett
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Post by Emmett » Thu Mar 15, 2007 9:17 pm

Google "Steinberg Free Filter". Izotope Ozone 3 also has a matching function. Neither one works very well.

Emmett

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Post by DewDude420 » Fri Nov 30, 2007 7:44 pm

In all honesty.....you should use ABSOUTELY NO EQ in playback.

that's if you're a purist, and despite the fact i love to label myself as an audio engineer and audiphile..even I'm not that big of a purist.

the biggest issue with what you want to do is you're dealing with mp3's, which completely ruin the spectrum of audio.

secondly...each mastering engineer is different. this engineer might of added more bass than another. you say you want a flat response...in all actuality...no two tracks/albums will have the SAME flat response..because a mastering engineer has already mixed it and designed it to sound good with no EQ. it's possible additional EQ may have been added, but you don't know what for sure.

attempting to match EQ levels among song is not only a very impractical idea, but it's almost on the realm of silly....sure..it sounds like a REALLY great idea..i can match all my EQ levels....sure...however, in the real world...that just wouldn't work. there's too many variables from mixing and mastering that you don't know..so you can't compensate for that...

if you REALLY want to re-eq your music...then your best bet is to do everything by hand..manually tweaking to your liking..that's the only guaranteed way you'll know.

you could do like i do...and run a physical analog hardware EQ. I have one on my stereo so i can EQ to the sound i want...however, i don't touch it. if something lacks a lot of highs or lows, then it's obviously in the mixing and wasn't designed to have it to begin with..

any of that make sense?

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